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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 2,070
Sponsored by: The Rainforest Site

There's no denying the trend that each year our summers get hotter. To compensate for the rise in temperature, we swim; we turn the blinds; we purchase sun shades for our cars; and, we crank our air conditioning: in the car, at work, and at home.

The problem is that our air conditioning units are actually making the planet hotter.

Air conditioning units are, in a word, inefficient. They account for an estimated 5% of annual American energy consumption, and spew 100 million tons of carbon dioxide into the air each year. Moreover, some air conditioning units still contain (and leak) refrigerants called hydrofluorocarbons, a very potent and long-lasting greenhouse gas.

The problem has a simple solution, right, to not use air conditioners? Not so fast. Air conditioning units actually do save the lives of children, the elderly, pets. Cooler temperatures have also proven to increase productivity. Factor in that researchers project the installation of 700 million air conditioners worldwide in the next 15 years, and 1.6 billion by 2050 and the solution doesn’t seem so simple.

Humans cannot afford to turn their back entirely on air conditioning, which is why the United States of America, where 86% of households have air conditioning, must push for innovation. Affordable air conditioning units powered by renewable energy must be made a priority.

Sign below to urge the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on the Budget and the U.S. Senate Committee on the Budget to make air conditioning innovation top priority by increasing the budget for non-defense research and development. It may be the only way the world finds a cool, clean solution.

Sign Here






To the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on the Budget and The U.S. Senate Committee on the Budget:

In 1965, just 10% of homes in the United States had air conditioning. Today, that number has risen to 86%. This is due to the increasing accessibility of air conditioning units—the decreasing cost, the ease of installation.

However, today’s air conditioning units are, in a word, inefficient. They account for an estimated 5% of annual American energy consumption, and spew 100 million tons of carbon dioxide into the air each year. Moreover, some air conditioning units still contain (and leak) refrigerants called hydrofluorocarbons, a very potent and long-lasting greenhouse gas.

In other words, by keeping our homes and workplaces cool, we’re heating up our planet—2016 is predicted to end as the hottest year on record, taking the title from 2015, who took the title from 2014.

The scariest part is that, when taking a moment to look around the world, it’s easy to see that other countries are prepared to follow America’s air conditioning lead, as researchers project that by 2050, 1.6 billion air conditioning units will be installed.

Look specifically to China for proof, and see that, in the last 15 years, the country has gone from just a few homes having air conditioning to all homes having air conditioning, and then some.

Look to India, to Indonesia, and to Brazil, and see that sales of air conditioning units are increasing at a rate of 10 to 15 percent per year.

Look to Mexico, where 13% of households currently have AC. Look to that number settling somewhere between 71% and 81% by 2100.

The air conditioning industry is booming, and, unless we find renewable solutions to keeping cool, it’ll be the end of us all. That’s why it is now, not tomorrow, that I call on you to embrace the idea that, despite our country’s recent hardships, America is still looked up to, and that it is we who must lead this change.

To do so, I ask you to please make air conditioning a top priority, and to place this delicate problem in the hands of our country’s most brilliant innovators by increasing the budget for non-defense research and development to develop clean, green alternatives to powering this essential technology.

Thank you.

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


Sep 20, 2017 Josie Avalos
Sep 19, 2017 Marianne Christensen
Sep 18, 2017 Rebecca Clark
Sep 18, 2017 Mary McGeary
Sep 16, 2017 Lola Schiefelbein
Sep 11, 2017 Liliana Elliot
Aug 31, 2017 Gillian Shults
Aug 31, 2017 Pamela Hazen
Aug 31, 2017 Barbara Salem-McCarthy
Aug 31, 2017 Angie LeMaster
Aug 31, 2017 Mary Galiani
Aug 31, 2017 Yves Decargouet
Aug 31, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Aug 29, 2017 Alyssa Oggiono
Aug 27, 2017 Lara Hembom
Aug 26, 2017 Elizabeth Broyles
Aug 24, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Aug 24, 2017 Lynn Miller
Aug 24, 2017 Tanya Lenn
Aug 23, 2017 Yael Saydon
Aug 22, 2017 jane Leavitt
Aug 22, 2017 Jane and Harold Rudner
Aug 22, 2017 Judith Mayhew
Aug 15, 2017 Penny Fleischman
Aug 15, 2017 Susan Fisher
Aug 14, 2017 Juliane Rocha
Aug 10, 2017 Joan Christensen
Aug 10, 2017 Ashley Wang
Aug 10, 2017 Lori Kegler
Aug 9, 2017 PEGGY Morris
Aug 8, 2017 Donna Gilbert
Aug 8, 2017 Joanne Koulavongsa
Aug 5, 2017 sandra baptistela
Aug 4, 2017 Ivan Zhyvolup
Aug 4, 2017 Nancy Bickford-Jordan We must do what we can. The US can have a positive multiplier effect.
Aug 3, 2017 J. Scott
Aug 2, 2017 Ornella Micone
Jul 31, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jul 31, 2017 Laurine League
Jul 29, 2017 William Kavanagh
Jul 29, 2017 Nadine Miller
Jul 28, 2017 Ana Guerra
Jul 28, 2017 Carol Dib
Jul 28, 2017 Theresa Randall
Jul 26, 2017 Victoria Hall
Jul 25, 2017 Rosie Albanese
Jul 24, 2017 Yola Stavridou
Jul 24, 2017 Kerry Gunby
Jul 23, 2017 Sophie Miranda
Jul 23, 2017 P Garbett

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