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The world was shocked when a wealthy American hunter, Walter Palmer, illegally killed and beheaded Cecil, a beloved and friendly lion for "sport." Cecil was lured off the wildlife preserve where he lived and murdered for Palmer's entertainment. Lions continue to be subjected to these needless hunts that stroke hunter's egos while devastating prides. Sign today to show your disgust with the barbaric practice of trophy hunting.
Goal: 300,000 Progress: 194,455
Sponsored by: The Rainforest Site

Tell the International Union for Conservation of Nature that vulnerable species shouldn't be allowed in game hunts.

Many people mistakenly and understandably think that lions are considered an endangered species. Lions have become extinct in 26 countries. Only seven countries – Botswana, Ethiopia, Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe – are believed to contain more than 1,000 lions each. Despite this fact, they are still only classified as a "vulnerable species" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the governing body that determines such categorizations, and by extension, whether certain protections are put in place for a species.

Between 1999 and 2008, 64% of the 5,663 lions that were killed in the African wild for sport ended up as trophies back in the United States. While arguments that the hefty fees associated with the permits to hunt these magnificent creatures can offset the costs of conservation efforts, the risk of this leading to eventual extinction is a real threat. Because prime male lions are often the most coveted trophies, the process places entire prides at risk by disrupting the species’ complex social structure. Prime male lions are the primary protectors of females and cubs, and a decrease in their population places the rest of the family in a truly vulnerable position. Killing the strongest and most fit lions also removes the best genes from the pool, weakening the species as a whole.

It's time to ensure that animals classified as "vulnerable" are truly protected. Tell the IUCN that trophy hunters should not be allowed to target vulnerable species.

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Dear Director General Julia Marton-Lefevre:

I believe the time has come to actively re-evaluate the protections we offer to vulnerable species. Your recommendations have such a powerful influence on how these decisions are made, and you are in an actionable position to increase the protection of truly vulnerable species, such as the African lion, a creature being ruthlessly hunted towards "endangered" status every year.

Many people mistakenly and understandably think that lions are considered an endangered species. Lions have become extinct in 26 countries. Despite this fact, they are still only classified as a "vulnerable species" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

While arguments that the hefty fees associated with the permits to hunt these magnificent creatures can offset the costs of conservation efforts, the risk of this leading to eventual extinction is a real threat. Because prime male lions are often the most coveted trophies, the process places entire prides at risk by disrupting the species' complex social structure. Prime male lions are the primary protectors of females and cubs, and their death places the rest of the family in a truly vulnerable position. Killing the strongest and most fit lions also removes the best genes from the pool, weakening the species as a whole.

Animals that are classified as "vulnerable" should be truly protected. Please change the legal status of "vulnerable" to prevent trophy hunters from targeting animals with precarious situations. Please consider addressing this urgent matter before you step down in 2014.

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


Jul 23, 2016 claudette cutajar
Jul 22, 2016 Iretta Wang
Jul 22, 2016 Martin Henz
Jul 21, 2016 Ida Lopez
Jul 21, 2016 Rachel Rakaczky
Jul 21, 2016 Donna Hutton
Jul 21, 2016 Patricia Kowal
Jul 21, 2016 Victoria Huddleston
Jul 20, 2016 Michael Petherick
Jul 20, 2016 Karen Van Tuyle
Jul 20, 2016 Lora Alm
Jul 20, 2016 Brittany Riedmayer
Jul 20, 2016 Linda Shifflett
Jul 20, 2016 Kathryn McKinnon
Jul 20, 2016 Robert Krone Stop this senseless killing and leave these animals alone.
Jul 20, 2016 Suzi Drake
Jul 19, 2016 mary e hunt
Jul 18, 2016 Amy Russell
Jul 18, 2016 Juls Robertson
Jul 18, 2016 Charlotte Gray
Jul 18, 2016 kathie kern
Jul 18, 2016 (Name not displayed)
Jul 18, 2016 casey muhs
Jul 18, 2016 Jean Blake
Jul 17, 2016 Esmee Bosch
Jul 16, 2016 (Name not displayed) This needs to stop no matter what it takes. No matter where this happens or where the trophy hunters live. there is no excuse or reason to tolerate trophy hunting, and killing.
Jul 16, 2016 Frances Simek
Jul 14, 2016 Jennifer Schmidt
Jul 14, 2016 Pat Souders
Jul 14, 2016 Gwen Walsh
Jul 14, 2016 André Henrique Bacci
Jul 13, 2016 Giordana Maranesi
Jul 12, 2016 Mary Anne Adams
Jul 12, 2016 Nicole Crowe
Jul 12, 2016 Alex Carr
Jul 10, 2016 Darlene Avery We must do the right thing now, and stop the hunting of lions and other wildlife in Africa, before they become extinct. What a blight on humanity to continue to allow this to happen. They are not vulnerable, but well on their way to becoming extinct.
Jul 7, 2016 Lea Faulks
Jul 7, 2016 Maggie Santiago
Jul 7, 2016 Julie Petty
Jul 6, 2016 Anastacia Whaling
Jul 6, 2016 d conway
Jul 6, 2016 Janice Geist
Jul 6, 2016 Yael Shimshon
Jul 4, 2016 Jacqueline Fonseca
Jul 4, 2016 Bonnie Steiger
Jul 4, 2016 Mina Blyly-Strauss
Jul 4, 2016 Charlotte Pinner
Jul 2, 2016 Turkiz Gokce
Jul 1, 2016 Kristin Womack
Jun 30, 2016 Molly B.H No other species of any animal hunts for sport, only a certain species of human does.

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