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Sponsored by: The Rainforest Site

Sign the petition and demand that the EPA stand by the regulations established in the Coal Combustion Residuals Rule.

Coal combustion residuals (CCRs), which are also known as coal ash, are the waste that's created by coal-fired power plants. The ash is a byproduct of burning coal for electricity. It is toxic, as it contains poisonous heavy metals like arsenic, lead, and mercury [1]. Coal ash is known to be one of the largest types of industrial waste generated in the United States. With more than 400 coal-fired power plants in the U.S. producing CCRs at a rate of over 100 million tons per year, the need for safe disposal of coal ash is clear [2].

Yet when it comes to regulating the discharge of coal ash, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is in the process of rolling back the rules in place. In May 2017, utility industry lobbyists petitioned for large portions of the Coal Combustion Residuals Rule to be reconsidered, rules that were put in place to protect both humans and the environment from this form of toxic waste. The coal ash rule was established in 2015 after Duke Energy spilled nearly 39,000 tons of coal ash into the Dan River near Eden, North Carolina [3].

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt granted their petition, allowing for provisions of the rule to be reconsidered. Recently, the EPA proposed over a dozen provisions to current regulations [4], which would give states more independence with their disposal of coal ash, and would allow alternative performance standards for disposal units [5].

For many reasons, these changes cannot happen.

Further rollbacks of coal ash regulations would only pose greater health risks to many Americans, and would increasingly threaten wildlife and the environment. Coal ash has been linked to serious medical issues, which include, but are not limited to, acute risk of cancer, neurological impairment, heart damage, lung disease, kidney disease, reproductive issues, and birth defects [7]. When not properly contained and disposed of, the toxic metals from coal ash can leach into groundwater, polluting the water and poisoning fish and wildlife. There have been instances where poor containment structures have failed and contaminated local drinking water [6]. Coal ash dust particles, which are harmful to the lungs and other major organs if inhaled, can be blown toward communities and recreational areas. According to a risk assessment conducted by the EPA in 2010, living near a wet coal ash storage pond is more dangerous than smoking a pack of cigarettes a day [8].

We must act in defense of our health and our environment. Tell the EPA to protect our communities from toxic waste. Sign the petition and demand the EPA keeps the established regulations of the Coal Combustion Residuals Rule in place!

Sign Here






Dear Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt,

Like many Americans, I am deeply concerned about the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed plan to change its regulations on the disposal of coal ash, which were put in place by the Coal Combustion Residuals Rule.

Coal ash is known to be one of the largest types of industrial waste generated in the United States. It is toxic, as it contains poisonous heavy metals like arsenic, lead, and mercury. More than 400 coal-fired power plants produce coal ash at a rate of over 100 million tons per year in the United States.

Coal ash has been linked to serious medical issues that include, but are not limited to, acute risk of cancer, neurological impairment, heart damage, lung disease, kidney disease, reproductive issues, and birth defects. When not properly contained and disposed of, the toxic metals from coal ash can leach into groundwater, polluting our water and poisoning fish and wildlife. It has caused water contamination problems across the country. The coal ash rule was established in 2015 after Duke Energy spilled nearly 39,000 tons of coal ash into the Dan River near Eden, North Carolina.

When inhaled, coal ash dust particles are harmful to human health. According to a risk assessment conducted by the EPA in 2010, living near a wet coal ash storage pond is more dangerous than smoking a pack of cigarettes a day.

Yet, despite the overwhelming evidence indicating the harmful effects of coal ash on human health, wildlife, and the environment, the EPA is proposing rollbacks to the rules in place at the behest of utility industry lobbyists. The proposed changes include over a dozen provisions to current regulations, and allow alternative performance standards for coal ash disposal units.

When considering the risks posed to human health and the environment, the approval of these changes is unethical and unacceptable, and they simply cannot happen.

I urge you to not move forward with the proposed rollbacks of the current coal ash regulations. Please do the right thing and protect our communities by maintaining the regulations originally put in place by the Coal Combustion Residuals Rule.

Because, I ask you, at what price is the value of human and environmental life?

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


Jul 16, 2018 Carmen Abel
Jul 16, 2018 Jean Le Marquand
Jul 16, 2018 michelle wright
Jul 15, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jul 14, 2018 Bernadette Monaghan
Jul 13, 2018 Katherine Head
Jul 13, 2018 elizabeth myrin shore
Jul 13, 2018 ioannis tsorvas
Jul 13, 2018 Anna Romanow
Jul 13, 2018 Donna Salisbury
Jul 12, 2018 Maria Hernandez
Jul 12, 2018 Mary Beth Broderson-Soper
Jul 12, 2018 Damini Bhookhun
Jul 11, 2018 Daniel Jordan
Jul 11, 2018 Beth Prudden
Jul 11, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jul 11, 2018 Mari Martinez
Jul 11, 2018 sheila mahoney
Jul 11, 2018 Sonia Minwer Barakat Requena
Jul 11, 2018 Alina Axt
Jul 10, 2018 Amy Vanderbilt
Jul 10, 2018 joan carter
Jul 10, 2018 Ani Tsultrim Wangmo
Jul 10, 2018 Jack Wenger
Jul 10, 2018 joann izumi
Jul 10, 2018 (Name not displayed) Please protect our health and environment
Jul 9, 2018 Tobi Zausner
Jul 9, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jul 9, 2018 beth reimel
Jul 9, 2018 (Name not displayed) So many other energy alternatives are cleaner and cheaper than coal. Lives are at stake -- go solar, geothermal, wind, or even natural gas! This Administration does not care about the planet or its people.
Jul 9, 2018 CHRISTINE REDMOND
Jul 9, 2018 Delores White This is an ongoing disaster in Tennessee and other states. Removing those regulations will puts millions in danger. Since the spill in 2004...many people have died from exposure..Please stop destroying our planet The EPA is suppose to protect our planet!
Jul 9, 2018 Kan DeLuke
Jul 9, 2018 jocely,e coenart
Jul 9, 2018 MaryEdna Salvi
Jul 9, 2018 Dina Canzoneri Don't let this rogue EPA destroy all the good work we have done to make our environment better!
Jul 8, 2018 Brian Johnson
Jul 8, 2018 Lori Colon
Jul 8, 2018 Norma Molina
Jul 8, 2018 Jeanne Carroll
Jul 8, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jul 8, 2018 Joseph Pascavage
Jul 8, 2018 Lee Hetzel
Jul 7, 2018 Beverly Linton
Jul 7, 2018 susan gallagher
Jul 7, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jul 7, 2018 M T
Jul 7, 2018 Raymond Sepeta Protect us from toxic coal ash pollution. You are supposed to protect our environment, not destroy it! Do your job!
Jul 7, 2018 Cynthia Dahlen
Jul 7, 2018 (Name not displayed)

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