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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 2,738
Sponsored by: The Rainforest Site

Each year, 2,000 large-scale hog operations in North Carolina house roughly 10 million hogs, making the coastal state one of the world’s top pork producers. It also makes North Carolina one of the biggest producers of hog feces. According to the Environmental Working Group, North Carolina wet animal waste (primarily consisting of hog feces) tallies in at over 10 billion gallons.

How does one go about managing 10 billion gallons of feces?

One of the primary ways in which hog feces has been managed in North Carolina is through anaerobic lagoons. These lagoons are created from a “manure slurry”, which is washed out from underneath the animal pens and then piped into the lagoon.” These lagoons are often constructed near primary sources of water, and operate without enclosure, meaning that gases like ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and methane are emitted into the surrounding air space.

More than that, when coastal disasters strike North Carolina, and those primary sources of water flood, these lagoons are breached. Gallons of feces then enter these water sources, introducing harmful substances to unsuspecting animals and people, including: antibiotics, estrogens, bacteria, pesticides, heavy metals, and protozoa.

This is detrimental, to the environment, and to the food webs relying upon these water sources.

While in 1999, following the devastation of Hurricane Floyd, the state of North Carolina banned the construction of new anaerobic lagoons in 1999. However, this didn’t include the anaerobic lagoons that were already operative. In effect, decades later, anaerobic lagoons remain the way some large-scale North Carolinian hog farms continue to manage their waste.

This is unacceptable. For our health, for the health of animals, and for the health of the environment, farmers everywhere must manage their livestock waste carefully, and with more in mind than cost. Tell the Environmental Protection Agency that you deserve better, that our farms are supposed to give us life, not take it from us. Sign the petition below and urge the EPA to ban anaerobic lagoons entirely.

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To the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency,

In 1999, by banning the construction of new aerobic lagoons, the state of North Carolina took a big step forward in reducing the amount of livestock feces contaminating local water sources. However, it wasn’t a large enough step.

Still, because the ban only halted the construction of new lagoons and not the lagoons already in operation, anaerobic lagoons continue to be a choice for large-scale farmers throughout the state. Natural disasters continue to result in the contents of these lagoons contaminating key sources of water throughout the state. Devastating substances from these farms and their livestock — antibiotics, estrogens, bacteria, pesticides, heavy metals, and protozoa — are being consumed by unsuspecting animals and people.

Even when not facing disaster, these open-topped lagoons have proven to be harmful, emitting toxic gases into the air, including ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, methane, and carbon dioxide. Not only does this affect the quality of life for those within sniffing distance, but, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council, it actually has a physical affect on the people living near these lagoons. Reported thus far are the following symptoms: headaches, shortness of breath, wheezing, excessive coughing, and diarrhea.

Administrator, our farms and water sources aren’t supposed to operate this way — they’re meant to give us life, not slowly take it away from us. It’s unacceptable for farms to continue managing waste in this manner and I urge the Environmental Protection Agency to ban anaerobic lagoons entirely.

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


Oct 19, 2017 Cathy Dennler
Oct 14, 2017 Karl-Heinz Braun
Oct 13, 2017 Roseann Maziarek
Oct 13, 2017 Terri Lynch
Oct 13, 2017 Beah Robinson
Oct 13, 2017 Donna Partin
Oct 3, 2017 Yolanda Hershey
Oct 2, 2017 Roxanne Hewitt
Oct 2, 2017 Mary Demarest-Paraan
Oct 2, 2017 Richard Pendarvis
Oct 2, 2017 jude lotz
Oct 1, 2017 John Moszyk
Oct 1, 2017 Joanne Raby
Sep 29, 2017 Annamaria Rizzo
Sep 28, 2017 Joan Christensen
Sep 28, 2017 Julie Brickell
Sep 27, 2017 Pamela Trepke
Sep 25, 2017 Sonia Paquin
Sep 24, 2017 Agatha toribio
Sep 23, 2017 Yumiko Starr
Sep 23, 2017 Tony Coppens
Sep 22, 2017 Richard Han
Sep 22, 2017 Monika Klewe
Sep 21, 2017 Kat Klahn
Sep 19, 2017 Richard Bosboom
Sep 18, 2017 Karen Moore
Sep 18, 2017 William Sherman
Sep 18, 2017 Mary McGeary
Sep 18, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Sep 17, 2017 André Henrique Bacci
Sep 16, 2017 monalisa pradhan stop all these horrible animals killing.. & save environment
Sep 16, 2017 mihaela gongescu
Sep 16, 2017 Fournier Fernande Tiere, sind Lebewesen! Dessen, sind Sie sich bewusst? Zivilisierte, Gesellschaft? Traurig, dass man Petionen unterschreiben muss. Dies, sollte selbstverständlich sein. Merci.
Sep 14, 2017 Lauri Moon
Sep 6, 2017 Mary Towers
Sep 5, 2017 Kristie Hatton
Sep 5, 2017 Kristie Hatton
Sep 3, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Sep 1, 2017 Ann Achuff
Aug 31, 2017 Wanda Majeski
Aug 31, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Aug 31, 2017 Blaze Bhence
Aug 29, 2017 Alyssa Oggiono
Aug 27, 2017 shelley stevens
Aug 25, 2017 Leela Beaudry
Aug 24, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Aug 24, 2017 Rilla Heslin
Aug 23, 2017 Gillian Lee
Aug 23, 2017 Lee Pohl
Aug 22, 2017 Robert Rogan

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