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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 7,995
Sponsored by: The Rainforest Site

In 1976, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was put in charge of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act which governs the disposal of solid and hazardous waste in the United States. Over the years, this important piece of legislation has seen many changes. Now, it's time for a new amendment.

Organic material like food scraps are currently piling up in America's landfills, rotting and producing methane, a greenhouse gas 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. According to the EPA, landfills are the third-largest source of methane in the U.S., behind industry and agriculture.

It doesn't have to be this way, though.

Across the country, cities have taken the initiative to implement mandatory composting and are experiencing environmental and economic benefits. Composting puts organic material to good use, as composing produces nutrient-rich fertilizer instead of generating methane. This can help stop or even reverse the fact that one-third of the world's arable land has been lost to soil erosion. A nation-wide system consisting of many small, local or regional operations would also help create sustainable, eco-friendly jobs across the country.

Composting isn't just a question of leaving table scraps separate for garbage collectors, however. Currently, in the United States, 71% of composting facilities are dedicated only to yard trimmings, infrastructure inadequate and unprepared to handle food waste. Lack of funding has halted much of the progress made in the 1990s towards the creation or expansion of more composting facilities, and this has to change if a national composting program is to become a reality.

Clearly, composting is as civil leaders like New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg say, the "final recycling frontier." We need the leadership of the EPA to tackle the proper management of compostable organic material.

Call on the EPA to amend the 1976 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to include mandatory composting collection of food scraps and other compostable materials and to collaborate with state and local governments to address the severe lack of funding and composting facilities equipped to receive and process food waste.

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To the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency,

New York's Mayor, Michael Bloomberg, has called composting the city's "final recycling frontier." I am writing to ask that you use your position of power and authority to create a new program for composting food waste on a national scale.

To help sustain our planet, we simply cannot afford to continue throwing away our food scraps. As you are probably aware, as food rots in landfills, it creates dangerous methane gas, a greenhouse gas 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. According to the EPA, landfills are the third-largest source of methane in the U.S., behind industry and agriculture.

Across the country, cities have taken the initiative to implement mandatory composting and are experiencing environmental and economic benefits. Composting puts organic material to good use, as composing produces nutrient-rich fertilizer instead of generating methane. This can help stop or even reverse the fact that one-third of the world's arable land has been lost to soil erosion. A nation-wide system consisting of many small, local or regional operations would also help create sustainable, eco-friendly jobs across the country.

Operations like these have proven large-scale composting operations can and do work.

Composting isn't just a question of leaving table scraps separate for garbage collectors, however. Currently, the United States, 71% of composting facilities are dedicated only to yard trimmings, infrastructure inadequate and unprepared to handle food waste. Lack of funding has halted much of the progress made in the 1990s towards the creation or expansion of more composting facilities, and this has to change if a national composting program is to become a reality.

Please, amend the 1976 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to include mandatory composting collection of food scraps and other compostable materials and collaborate with state and local governments to address the severe lack of funding and composting facilities equipped to receive and process food waste.

The United States needs the leadership and vision of the EPA to tackle the proper management of compostable organic material. It can be done. Indeed, for the health of our country and planet, it must be done.

Thank you,

Petition Signatures


Aug 14, 2018 Martha Eberle
Aug 13, 2018 Erin Foley-Collins
Aug 13, 2018 sarah stevens
Aug 13, 2018 Peter Skirenko
Aug 12, 2018 Linda Tabb
Aug 11, 2018 Anne PIZELLE
Aug 9, 2018 Denise Griffin
Aug 9, 2018 Richard Brigg
Aug 9, 2018 Heather Vargas
Aug 9, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Aug 8, 2018 Carola Roy
Aug 7, 2018 Katherine burt
Aug 7, 2018 Cara Blazucki
Aug 7, 2018 Emily Dahle
Aug 7, 2018 Sandra Backelund
Aug 4, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Aug 4, 2018 Catherine Jarvey
Aug 2, 2018 Sharron Dupree
Aug 2, 2018 Linda Fleming
Aug 2, 2018 Jan Amann
Aug 2, 2018 Jane Maria Euteneuer
Aug 2, 2018 Chris Nuzum
Aug 2, 2018 Lin Westler
Aug 2, 2018 Elaine Coburn
Aug 2, 2018 Penny Fleischman
Aug 2, 2018 Valéria Cecília Di Dib
Aug 2, 2018 Teresa Tarin
Aug 1, 2018 Alice Bergmann
Jul 29, 2018 Wendy Green
Jul 29, 2018 Carol Joan Patterson
Jul 29, 2018 Barbara Smolinski
Jul 28, 2018 charin Suarez Very necessary
Jul 28, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jul 28, 2018 John Bramlet
Jul 27, 2018 G. Tompkins
Jul 27, 2018 ana trillo
Jul 27, 2018 Marilyn Miravalles
Jul 25, 2018 Carole Havelka
Jul 25, 2018 Jennifer Gindt
Jul 25, 2018 Patricia Eberhard
Jul 23, 2018 Rebekah Herdman
Jul 23, 2018 Karena Harmon
Jul 23, 2018 Pauline Köhler
Jul 23, 2018 Kristyn MacPhail
Jul 23, 2018 Caroline CEDELLE
Jul 23, 2018 yola ileen gitter
Jul 23, 2018 wanda plucinski
Jul 23, 2018 Gemma Eggleton
Jul 22, 2018 Manuela Carrondo
Jul 22, 2018 KL Hellenbach

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