Skip navigation

no spam, unsubscribe anytime.
Skip navigation
Goal: 30,000 Progress: 4,009
Sponsored by: The Rainforest Site

They are as ubiquitous as they are deadly. Plastic bags are in grocery stores across the United States, helping shoppers carry their goods to car and home with ease.

But what is the real cost of a few minutes of carrying convenience?

The resources and effort that goes into producing plastic grocery bags is enormous. It's estimated that U.S. retailers spend $4 billion a year on disposable bags which in turn inflates the cost of goods. According to the Citizens' Campaign for the Environment, it takes 2.2 billion pounds of fossil fuels and 3.9 billion gallons of fresh water to produce the 100 billion plastic bags the U.S. consumes each year, the manufacturing process of which results a billion pounds of solid waste and 2.7 million tons of CO2 per year. The bags are made from crude oil and natural gas, both of which are dirty, nonrenewable energy sources.

Plastic bags harm animals on land, air, and sea. Animals often mistake them for food and upon consumption, the bags block air and/or digestive passages causing death. In fact, 267 species of marine life are negatively impacted by plastic pollution, and it's believed that every square mile of ocean has about 46,000 pieces of plastic floating in it.

Around the world, 20 countries have already implemented plastic bag legislation. In the United States, 148 cities have some form of plastic bag legislation, 5 cities have a plastic bag fee, and DC taxes plastic bags. And contrary to what the plastics industry may say, in cities and nations that have enacted plastic bag bans, there has been no proof linking the legislation to negatively impacting the grocery business.

Clearly, the benefits to regulating plastic grocery bags to the annals of history has many benefits for both people and the planet. Please urge the EPA to draft and advocate for legislation that would ban plastic grocery bags in the USA.

Sign Here






To the Secretary of the EPA:

Plastic grocery bags are destroying our ecosystem and animal life all for a few moments of convenience to carry purchases from store to home. As concerned citizens, we are writing to you to ask you to step in.

Please draft and advocate for legislation that would ban plastic grocery bags in the USA.

The resources and effort that goes into producing plastic grocery bags is enormous. It's estimated that U.S. retailers spend $4 billion a year on disposable bags which in turn inflates the cost of goods. According to the Citizens' Campaign for the Environment, it takes 2.2 billion pounds of fossil fuels and 3.9 billion gallons of fresh water to produce the 100 billion plastic bags the U.S. consumes each year, the manufacturing process of which results a billion pounds of solid waste and 2.7 million tons of CO2 per year. The bags are made from crude oil and natural gas, both of which are dirty, nonrenewable energy sources.

Plastic bags harm animals on land, air, and sea. Animals often mistake them for food and upon consumption, block air and/or digestive passages causing death. In fact, 267 species of marine life are negatively impacted by plastic pollution, and it's believed that every square mile of ocean has about 46,000 pieces of plastic floating in it.

Around the world, 20 countries have already implemented plastic bag legislation. In the United States, 148 cities have some form of plastic bag legislation, 5 cities have a plastic bag fee, and DC taxes plastic bags. And contrary to what the plastics industry may say, in cities and nations that have enacted plastic bag bans, there has been no proof linking the legislation to negatively impacting the grocery business.

Clearly, the benefits to regulating plastic grocery bags to the annals of history has many benefits for both people and the planet. Please do your part to end the dangerous ubiquity of plastic grocery bags!

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


Apr 21, 2017 Nicholas Lee
Apr 21, 2017 Corrina Parker
Apr 20, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Apr 20, 2017 Glynn Fletcher
Apr 20, 2017 michelle johnson
Apr 17, 2017 Makise Chika
Apr 16, 2017 Lanette Norris
Apr 15, 2017 Lily Dayan Cimadoro
Apr 14, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Apr 12, 2017 María Galarce
Apr 12, 2017 Greg Okun
Apr 12, 2017 Axa Tolonen
Apr 11, 2017 darcia hurst
Apr 11, 2017 Jean Dobizl
Apr 11, 2017 Doris Bulenda
Apr 11, 2017 Megan Dunmire
Apr 11, 2017 Josette Maury
Apr 11, 2017 Debbie Davis CMKBD CAPS
Apr 10, 2017 Carolyn Batchelder
Apr 10, 2017 Susan Madden
Apr 9, 2017 I. meszaros
Apr 8, 2017 David Schnitzler
Apr 8, 2017 Anne-Marie Battaglia
Apr 7, 2017 Barbara Holdredge
Apr 6, 2017 Anne Immelnut Ban plastic bags, require all packaging be either recyclable or biodegradable.
Apr 6, 2017 Lens Lucas
Apr 5, 2017 Caterina Raviglione
Apr 5, 2017 Eleonora De Giorgio
Apr 5, 2017 bulbul dasgupta
Apr 5, 2017 dipanwita dasgupta
Apr 4, 2017 Evelyn Peterson
Apr 4, 2017 JANICK SANSON
Apr 3, 2017 kerri mcmurdie
Apr 3, 2017 Tina Pelton
Apr 3, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Apr 3, 2017 Alper Arslan
Apr 3, 2017 Deborah Lill
Apr 3, 2017 Jane Smith
Apr 2, 2017 Dorothy Chandler
Apr 1, 2017 Kathleen Siskron
Apr 1, 2017 Kara Walmsley
Mar 31, 2017 Tim Young
Mar 30, 2017 jeanette wilson
Mar 30, 2017 maureen boag
Mar 30, 2017 Catherine Giblin
Mar 28, 2017 Valéria Menicucci
Mar 26, 2017 Marsha Croner
Mar 25, 2017 Linda howe
Mar 25, 2017 Kyriaki P
Mar 25, 2017 Alice VanKoevering

back to top

Share this page and help protect habitat: