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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 4,274
Sponsored by: The Rainforest Site

They are as ubiquitous as they are deadly. Plastic bags are in grocery stores across the United States, helping shoppers carry their goods to car and home with ease.

But what is the real cost of a few minutes of carrying convenience?

The resources and effort that goes into producing plastic grocery bags is enormous. It's estimated that U.S. retailers spend $4 billion a year on disposable bags which in turn inflates the cost of goods. According to the Citizens' Campaign for the Environment, it takes 2.2 billion pounds of fossil fuels and 3.9 billion gallons of fresh water to produce the 100 billion plastic bags the U.S. consumes each year, the manufacturing process of which results a billion pounds of solid waste and 2.7 million tons of CO2 per year. The bags are made from crude oil and natural gas, both of which are dirty, nonrenewable energy sources.

Plastic bags harm animals on land, air, and sea. Animals often mistake them for food and upon consumption, the bags block air and/or digestive passages causing death. In fact, 267 species of marine life are negatively impacted by plastic pollution, and it's believed that every square mile of ocean has about 46,000 pieces of plastic floating in it.

Around the world, 20 countries have already implemented plastic bag legislation. In the United States, 148 cities have some form of plastic bag legislation, 5 cities have a plastic bag fee, and DC taxes plastic bags. And contrary to what the plastics industry may say, in cities and nations that have enacted plastic bag bans, there has been no proof linking the legislation to negatively impacting the grocery business.

Clearly, the benefits to regulating plastic grocery bags to the annals of history has many benefits for both people and the planet. Please urge the EPA to draft and advocate for legislation that would ban plastic grocery bags in the USA.

Sign Here






To the Secretary of the EPA:

Plastic grocery bags are destroying our ecosystem and animal life all for a few moments of convenience to carry purchases from store to home. As concerned citizens, we are writing to you to ask you to step in.

Please draft and advocate for legislation that would ban plastic grocery bags in the USA.

The resources and effort that goes into producing plastic grocery bags is enormous. It's estimated that U.S. retailers spend $4 billion a year on disposable bags which in turn inflates the cost of goods. According to the Citizens' Campaign for the Environment, it takes 2.2 billion pounds of fossil fuels and 3.9 billion gallons of fresh water to produce the 100 billion plastic bags the U.S. consumes each year, the manufacturing process of which results a billion pounds of solid waste and 2.7 million tons of CO2 per year. The bags are made from crude oil and natural gas, both of which are dirty, nonrenewable energy sources.

Plastic bags harm animals on land, air, and sea. Animals often mistake them for food and upon consumption, block air and/or digestive passages causing death. In fact, 267 species of marine life are negatively impacted by plastic pollution, and it's believed that every square mile of ocean has about 46,000 pieces of plastic floating in it.

Around the world, 20 countries have already implemented plastic bag legislation. In the United States, 148 cities have some form of plastic bag legislation, 5 cities have a plastic bag fee, and DC taxes plastic bags. And contrary to what the plastics industry may say, in cities and nations that have enacted plastic bag bans, there has been no proof linking the legislation to negatively impacting the grocery business.

Clearly, the benefits to regulating plastic grocery bags to the annals of history has many benefits for both people and the planet. Please do your part to end the dangerous ubiquity of plastic grocery bags!

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


Oct 23, 2017 Louise Gross
Oct 23, 2017 Rebecca Oberlin
Oct 22, 2017 Cathy Dennler
Oct 22, 2017 Lida Stevenson
Oct 22, 2017 janine pol
Oct 22, 2017 Ekta Singh
Oct 21, 2017 Nicky Weir
Oct 21, 2017 Carol Wellman
Oct 21, 2017 Melissa Bird
Oct 21, 2017 Aurelia Gergely
Oct 17, 2017 Sheila Hofer We are way over due to stop using plastic bags for groceries...are we Nuts and just don't give a damm.People can keep cloth bags in there cars for shopping if they would just not be sooo lazy.Stop this harm to our earth Now!!!
Oct 16, 2017 Brent Pennell
Oct 16, 2017 Robert Keiser
Oct 16, 2017 Terri Robb
Oct 16, 2017 CAROL OZOUF
Oct 15, 2017 Etresia Diedericks
Oct 15, 2017 Ivan Zhyvolup
Oct 15, 2017 Peter Simon
Oct 14, 2017 celia perigord
Oct 14, 2017 Tara Spires
Oct 14, 2017 Karl-Heinz Braun
Oct 13, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Oct 13, 2017 Sandra Cobb
Oct 13, 2017 Crystal Miller
Oct 13, 2017 Giovanna Martinez
Oct 10, 2017 Lori Dozark
Oct 10, 2017 Jon & Janet Burrows
Oct 9, 2017 Mark Butler
Oct 5, 2017 Diana Yoder
Oct 5, 2017 Candi Gibson-Rogers
Oct 5, 2017 Bonnie Shelley
Oct 4, 2017 Ankita Jain
Oct 2, 2017 Judy McKinney
Oct 2, 2017 Janet Robinson
Oct 2, 2017 Diane Hall
Oct 2, 2017 Tia Simon
Oct 2, 2017 Sara Garcia
Oct 2, 2017 Lynette Rynders
Oct 2, 2017 Valérie Drianne
Oct 1, 2017 John Moszyk
Sep 29, 2017 Fabian Müller
Sep 29, 2017 K Moore
Sep 29, 2017 Annamaria Rizzo
Sep 28, 2017 Diana Monks
Sep 28, 2017 Sandra Tucker
Sep 28, 2017 Julie Brickell
Sep 28, 2017 Jamie Phillips
Sep 28, 2017 Jennifer Follows
Sep 28, 2017 Jennifer Harnish
Sep 28, 2017 C S Goloversic

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