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The South African constitutional court has officially dismissed an application to appeal the legalization of the buying and selling of rhino horns [1]. This means that soon, the rhino horn trade will once again become totally legal in the country of South Africa.

More and more rhinos are being poached every single day in order for hunters to get their hands on the valuable horns. Just in the four-year span between 2008 and 2012, rhinos killed by poachers jumped from 83 to 688 [2].

Currently, almost 70 percent of the world's rhino population is located in South Africa, meaning that that vast majority of the earth's rhinos would be in jeopardy from this decision [3].

"If these regs are promulgated, we will see a significant rise in poaching, as poachers use the significant loopholes to cater to the increased demand for horn in the Far East," Morgan Griffiths, of the Wildlife and Environment Society of South Africa.

Rhino horns are so highly sought after by poachers because of the ridiculous amount of money (as much as $300,000) they fetch from countries like China and Vietnam where they are believed to help cure diseases, and even hangovers [3].

Even though some believe that legalizing the rhino horn trade will actually help prevent poaching, many conservationists argue that it will only increase the killing of rhinos for their horns [4].

When this ban is officially lifted, it will put a massive amount of the world's rhino back in danger of being needlessly killed unless we intervene and stop this legalization and increase enforcement of the current ban. Sign to show your support of the ban on the rhino horn trade!

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Dear Constitutional Court of South Africa,

If the ban on the buying of selling of rhino horns in South Africa is lifted, these incredible animals will become even more endangered than they already are.

Since so many of the world's rhino population are found in your very own country, keeping the rhino horn trade illegal will not only keep the animals safe, but it will help to discourage other countries from believing legalization of the trade is viable.

With poaching massively on the rise, rhinos are in more danger than ever before. Making it legal to buy and sell their horns will only encourage hunters to seek out the animals even more because it will be that much easier to make quick and easy money.

Your court has the power to keep so many rhinos safe from potential harm if the rhino horn trade stays illegal and is simply enforced. But lifting the current ban completely will almost surely be a disaster for these amazing creatures.

Please hear us and do not remove the ban on the rhino horn trade in South Africa, because we want rhinos to continue to thrive and remain as protected as possible.

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


Jul 17, 2018 John Rybicki
Jul 17, 2018 NADINE RITTER
Jul 17, 2018 marie blanche brabant
Jul 17, 2018 Ryan McKenzie
Jul 16, 2018 Margarita Politte
Jul 16, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jul 16, 2018 Diamond Giatzoglou
Jul 16, 2018 Jean Le Marquand It is despicable that the South African authorities allow these rhinos to be driven into extinction. What a shameless lack of responsibility this shows...who will be next in the gun-sights of ruthless killsers?
Jul 16, 2018 Mary Schmotzer
Jul 15, 2018 Maria Charlier
Jul 15, 2018 Gavin Putz
Jul 15, 2018 Sabrina Hurd
Jul 15, 2018 Flora Psarianos
Jul 15, 2018 Stephanie Betts
Jul 15, 2018 Janet Marineau
Jul 15, 2018 Paul Grohman
Jul 14, 2018 Jeffrey Diehl
Jul 14, 2018 Gloria Cameron
Jul 14, 2018 Lara Santos
Jul 13, 2018 Chay Krasner
Jul 13, 2018 Caroline Debaille
Jul 13, 2018 Donna Salisbury
Jul 13, 2018 Christine Müller
Jul 13, 2018 Lisa Koons
Jul 12, 2018 irina antoshkina
Jul 12, 2018 Debra Bolog
Jul 12, 2018 Ana Krznarić
Jul 12, 2018 Gena Strom
Jul 12, 2018 VICTORIA hALL
Jul 12, 2018 teena berger
Jul 12, 2018 Toby Collins
Jul 12, 2018 jackie montanile
Jul 12, 2018 Colette van Os
Jul 12, 2018 Laura García
Jul 11, 2018 Kim DelMonico
Jul 11, 2018 Charlene Cooper
Jul 11, 2018 Edward Hughes
Jul 11, 2018 Mark Gorres
Jul 11, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jul 11, 2018 Julie White
Jul 11, 2018 Angela Berard
Jul 11, 2018 Eve Lee
Jul 11, 2018 Cathy Molligi
Jul 11, 2018 Patricia Jio
Jul 11, 2018 Shai Albright
Jul 11, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jul 11, 2018 Leandrie Venter
Jul 11, 2018 Nadia Gibbs
Jul 10, 2018 Siti Arafah
Jul 10, 2018 (Name not displayed)

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